How to Create an Experience Your Customers Can’t Stop Talking About

How to Create an Experience Your Customers Can’t Stop Talking About

Last week in NYC my kids stumbled upon a store that looked interesting. 

The store was called Camp.

We entered the fun looking toy store and then something fascinating happened. An associate of the store approached my girls and asked them to come to a nearby bookshelf along the wall.

She then proceeded to ask the girls if they believed in magic. They both nodded and out the count of three pushed the bookshelf to open up to a secret store within the store.

“Welcome to Camp!” she said as she escorted us into the store. Inside we found a whole other world of toys and experiences.

The girls ended up registering for slime making camp which was ultimately confiscated by TSA on our flight home! 

But Camp offered a genuinely fantastic customer experience that we instantly wanted to talk about and tell others about.

Every other business today is touting that they create experiences, and in most cases, they’re shameless attempts to cash in on the idea of experience, without actually doing the work. 

As an example, having a mascot walk around in an old, dusty costume, and a pit of balls the kids can jump in isn’t really an immersive, family fun experience. I might be exaggerating, but watch this week’s video to learn more:

What if, like many of my readers, you’re in the B2B space and want to create tremendous customer experiences?  

And before you say, “but my business is different,” consider this. I’ve seen clients in different industries from B2C companies, to B2B firms like heavy equipment manufacturers, take this concept and use it to create a compelling, unforgettable experience for their clients.

Well, it’s even easier there. 

Have a person pick up the phone when people call.  

Follow up on every quote within 48 hours.  

Ensure your salespeople are doing what they promise.

Ensure your management is providing every department the support they need to get your clients what you promised them.  In short, aim for good first.

I remember one manufacturing client that sold a very expensive piece of machinery. Each machine received a plaque commemorating the purchase and recognized the company who bought it. The client was always THRILLED, surprised, and they always told others about it.

So let me ask you a question:

Would your company be willing to spend money on an experience never to be forgotten by your customers, an experience that people can’t stop talking about – ever? You would be foolish not to.

What if a company could spend considerably less, and create an experience with equal impact?

Your Challenge For This Week: Try to come up with a few unique ideas for your remarkable moments or to enhance your customer's experience.

What could you add to the customer experience that has this level of impact–making your experience practically unforgettable?

For retail, think about the first time someone comes into a store or makes their first purchase.

For e-commerce, think about the unboxing experience.

For B2B manufacturers, distributors, etc. think about when you deliver the product, or when a client spends a certain amount with your company.

What could you do, or add, that's truly memorable and invokes the same type of reaction I shared in the video?

If you’re having trouble, reach out, and I’ll brainstorm a few ideas with you.